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Download Invisible enemy : the African American freedom struggle by Greta de Jong PDF

By Greta de Jong

This account of the evolution of yankee racism outlines how colorblind techniques to discrimination ensured the perpetuation of racial inequality within the usa way past the Sixties. it's a chronicle of the evolution of yankee racism, its perpetuation, and black people's struggles for equality within the put up civil rights period. It presents scholars with a greater realizing of the stories of black Read more...

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Invisible enemy : the African American freedom struggle after 1965

This account of the evolution of yank racism outlines how colorblind techniques to discrimination ensured the perpetuation of racial inequality within the usa way past the Sixties. it's a chronicle of the evolution of yank racism, its perpetuation, and black people's struggles for equality within the submit civil rights period.

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The emphasis was on providing training and services rather than job creation, and the amount of money allocated was less than one-tenth of what most analysts thought was needed. Black leaders nonetheless supported the bill as a necessary corollary to ending legalized segregation. Whitney Young of the NUL told a House subcommittee in April that passage of the legislation was needed from the freedom movement to free markets 33 to demonstrate to African Americans that the nation was truly committed to racial equality.

As in earlier periods when possibilities were opened to end racism in the United States, however, the vested interests of powerful constituencies conspired to obstruct further progress. The same white supremacists who opposed civil rights legislation attacked the war on poverty with equal ferocity. Middle-class homeowners seeking to preserve their ability to exclude African Americans from their communities reacted strongly against the Johnson administration’s attempts to enforce civil rights laws.

George Wallace’s campaign for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination in 1964 revealed how subtle appeals to racism couched in the language of individual liberty could be used to draw support from broad segments of the white population. As governor of Alabama Wallace famously pledged to defend “Segregation now! Segregation tomorrow! ” in the early 1960s. When the passage of civil rights legislation and increasing black voter registration made such overtly racist positions less tenable, Wallace shifted his focus to attacking federal “tyranny” and administrators’ attempts to impose their unpopular social ideals on other Americans.

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